Veterans Day: The torch held high

The torch: Be ours to hold it high.

It has been a tradition at both TOC and the blog Liberty Unyielding, for which I was editor at large from 2012 to October 2021, to post a recurring Veterans Day article.  In 2020, I published the version below for the first time.  It’s interesting to me to reread it now, and realize how much has changed in the last year.  See if you feel the same. – JED

Since 2018, when we passed the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, it has seemed less relevant to commemorate Veterans Day with the annual post we used to use (the last iteration was here).

As we honor military veterans on 11 November, however, I miss an integral element of that old annual post: the John McCrae poem from 1915, “In Flanders Fields.” Continue reading “Veterans Day: The torch held high”

Ninety-seven years

We shall not sleep.

The Unknown Soldier from WWI laid out in the Capitol rotunda in 1921.
The Unknown Soldier from WWI laid out in the Capitol rotunda in 1921.

This post, an annual tradition for Veterans Day at The Optimistic Conservative since 2009, is now an annual tradition at Liberty Unyielding.

Ninety-seven years ago, in the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the armistice was proclaimed that ended the terrible fighting in World War I.  A war that had erupted in large part because Europe’s political leaders, a century on from the Napoleonic conflicts, were accustomed to war remaining limited, produced some of the bloodiest battles ever fought. The six-month battle of the Somme in 1916 took the lives of an unimaginable 1.5 million French, German, and British soldiers – without either side achieving sustainable penetration of the line of confrontation, or any operational victory. WWI was the most tactically and politically frustrating of wars, admitting little maneuver, little jockeying for advantage, and no enduring significance to victory. Continue reading “Ninety-seven years”

Ninety-six years

Keeping faith with those who lie in Flanders fields.

Armistice Day, 11 November, 1918, on Wall Street. (Image: Wikipedia)
Armistice Day, 11 November, 1918, on Wall Street. (Image: Wikipedia)

This post, an annual tradition for Veterans Day at The Optimistic Conservative since 2009, is now an annual tradition at Liberty Unyielding.  Enjoy!

Ninety-five years

We will never forget.

Interment of the Unknown Soldier, 11 November 1921
Interment of the Unknown Soldier, 11 November 1921

This post is an annual tradition for Veterans Day at The Optimistic Conservative.

This year, I am putting up the Veterans Day post on the anniversary of USS Olympia’s arrival in Washington Navy Yard, on 9 November 1921, bearing the body of the Unknown Soldier from World War I. Continue reading “Ninety-five years”

Ninety-Four Years

Never forget.

This post is an annual tradition on Veterans Day at The Optimistic Conservative.

Ninety-four years ago, in the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the armistice was proclaimed that ended the terrible fighting in World War I.  A war that had erupted in large part because Europe’s political leaders, a century on from the Napoleonic conflicts, were accustomed to war remaining limited, produced some of the bloodiest battles ever fought. The six-month battle of the Somme in 1916 took the lives of an unimaginable 1.5 million French, German, and British soldiers – without either side achieving sustainable penetration of the line of confrontation, or any operational victory. WWI was the most tactically and politically frustrating of wars, Continue reading “Ninety-Four Years”