Three things to keep in mind about Obamacare

It’s the existential crisis, stupid.

We’re getting off track here, people.

We all keep obediently discussing the new Revelation du Jour about the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad implementation of Obamacare.  And to some extent, that’s necessary.  People need to know the harm that could come from entering their personal information on the website.  They also need to stay abreast of actual news that might help them plan to get through the next few months.

But the more we talk about the mechanical failures of Obamacare, the more we’re behaving like Continue reading “Three things to keep in mind about Obamacare”

A house divided: The GOP dialogue continues

There’s a reason for it. It’s not going away.

I wrote a few days ago about the current division in the Republican Party, which is as profound as I can remember seeing it in my lifetime.  The dialogue on this isn’t going to end any time soon.  There’s a sense in which we would be shortsighted to want it to.  Some observations.

1.  Rush Limbaugh is right about the Tea Party and other limited-government conservatives.  They have been galvanized by the recent fight, not abashed.  The sense about Ted Cruz among limited-government conservatives may be best expressed by Lincoln’s famous exclamation Continue reading “A house divided: The GOP dialogue continues”

GOP: Polls and hinge points of history

Shocker: polls show GOP divided.

What does it mean that recent polls show 7 in 10 respondents think Republicans are putting their agenda ahead of what’s good for the country, as opposed to the 5 in 10 respondents who think President Obama is doing the same?

The answer probably lies in an analysis of the ancillary question posed in the NBC/Wall Street Journal poll: do respondents agree or not with the statement that the GOP or the president is “demonstrating strong leadership and standing up for what they [he] believe[s] in”?

For Republicans, only 27% of respondents agreed with that statement.  For Obama, 46% of them agreed.

On the face of it, that’s actually a contradictory assessment Continue reading “GOP: Polls and hinge points of history”

You say Thermopylae, I say Alamo

That roll-call in the sky.

A few observations on the battle for America’s future as it shapes up heading for 1 October, or perhaps 17 October, or perhaps a date after that.

1.  Allen West invoked Thermopylae, Leonidas, and the 300 Spartans as an analogy to where we are after Ted Cruz’s stand in the Senate this week.  Cruz being from Texas, I was going to invoke the Alamo, Colonel Travis, and the 180-some who died with him in the siege there.  But OK.

As every school kid used to know, Thermopylae and the Alamo both mattered, even though both battles were lost by their tiny contingents of doughty defenders.  The pass at Thermopylae was well-chosen terrain for a defending force as small as the Spartans’; the Alamo was poorly chosen for making a defensive stand against a much superior Mexican army.  Both battles were, in any case, lost.  But Continue reading “You say Thermopylae, I say Alamo”

Why Ted Cruz speaks for me

Warriors versus wimps.

Ted Cruz and his allies get it.  They get that Americans can’t afford to have Obamacare implemented against our groaning, near-collapse finances.  They get that we are disgusted (and alarmed) at the idea of being the GOP’s economic attrition strategy for the 2014 election: the strategy that says, “Let things get as bad as they’re going to with Obamacare, and then people will finally blame the Democrats.”  The problem with that strategy is that someone has to pay the price for it – has to accept the financial losses, which for many people could be disastrous, even permanently life-changing – and that someone is us.

Cruz – and Mike Lee in the Senate, along with Matt Salmon (AZ) and others in the House – show that they get what the stakes are, Continue reading “Why Ted Cruz speaks for me”