When playing for time, think big and strategic

There’s a better deal to be had.

So opponents of Obamacare have one big thing going for us:  the roll-out of the federal exchange has been epically awful.  Really, just so terribly bad that it appears very few customers have been able to sign up yet.  The federal exchange website had to shut down to try and repair some of its problems, and that doesn’t seem to have made anything better.

With an unexpected gift like this, an aggressive political strategist would try to capitalize on it.  Instead, House Speaker Boehner has decided to give President Obama the one thing Obamacare needs: more time.  Boehner proposes not just to let him have it, but to give it to him for free.  We’re hearing this morning that Boehner will offer a 6-week increase in the federal debt ceiling, “demanding” nothing more than a promise from Obama to negotiate on federal spending in the interim.

I have no doubt that Boehner sees this as playing for time for the GOP-held House, as well as giving Obama time. Continue reading “When playing for time, think big and strategic”

Navy buys biofuel for $16 a gallon

Really hot gas.

This is going to help the Defense Department weather looming budget cuts, for sure.  Teaming up with the Department of Agriculture (which has a cheery Rotary Club ring to it), the Navy has purchased 450,000 gallons of biofuel for about $16 a gallon, or about 4 times the price of its standard marine fuel, JP-5, which has been going for under $4 a gallon.

You won’t be surprised to learn that a member of Obama’s presidential transition team, T. J. Glauthier, is a “strategic advisor” at Solazyme, the California company that is selling a portion of the biofuel to the Navy.  Glauthier worked – shock, shock – Continue reading “Navy buys biofuel for $16 a gallon”

Think Big: It’s Our Only Option

Deregulate, and pay off debt.

As usual, I liked Kevin D. Williamson’s piece at NRO today on the real drivers of federal deficits (hint: not tax cuts, not wars, not bailouts).  Among several gems, he comes up with this one, on the effects of government control of economic sectors:

The only important products in the United States that do not get better and cheaper every year are K–12 education and health care, which are about 97 percent and 55 percent dominated by the government, respectively, and therefore have little consumer-price pressure.

I would have said health care was more like 75% dominated by the government, but the point is the same, and extremely well made.  He says this too, however: Continue reading “Think Big: It’s Our Only Option”