China-Taiwan: Notes on a war game

NBC’s Meet the Press Reports published a new online episode this past week in which the network sponsored a war game for a China-Taiwan scenario developing in 2027.  The episode, entitled “War Games: Battle for Taiwan,” and hosted by Chuck Todd, can be accessed here.

These are just a few notes on a topic that needs a much more in-depth treatment.  But it’s worth registering some top-level comments as this subject garners more and more attention in the coming days.

I would say at the outset that criticism here isn’t intended in any way to mock the effort made to hold the war game and put it together for presentation.  It’s a tough proposition for anyone, and summarizing the results is invariably a matter of choosing and framing priorities, regardless of who’s doing it. Continue reading “China-Taiwan: Notes on a war game”

Incredibly, U.S. forces fail to intercept Russian bombers circumnavigating Guam

Peace in our time.

Tu-95MS Bear H intercepted in April 2014 by an RAF Typhoon.  (Image via The Aviationist)
Tu-95MS Bear H intercepted in April 2014 by an RAF Typhoon. (Image via The Aviationist)

New post up at Liberty Unyielding.  Enjoy!

Defense cuts and the fragile, undefended bubble we now live in

Peace in our time.

What is there to say that most readers even need to hear?  As he did so often, Reagan summed it up nicely in a brief, well-known phrase:

Of the four wars in my lifetime, none came about because the U.S. was too strong.

An especially important point here is that the converse is true.  The conditions for major war develop much more easily when the U.S. is too weak. They are developing as we speak. Continue reading “Defense cuts and the fragile, undefended bubble we now live in”

China: Ignoring UNCLOS, ordering a U.S. Navy cruiser to stop

Post-Pax blues.

If you were wondering whether it’s bad that the Chinese navy maneuvered aggressively near a U.S. Navy ship last week, ordering the ship to stop and then driving a Chinese ship right in front of it, dangerously close, the answer is yes.  It’s bad – bad from two standpoints: naval professionalism, and China’s posture in the South China Sea.  We’ll look at both here.

Briefly, the backstory is that China’s new aircraft carrier, the former-Soviet carrier refitted by China and named the Liaoning, transited in November from a northern port to the South China Sea for her first operations in southerly waters.  In late November, Liaoning got underway with an escort of two destroyers and two frigates to conduct operations in the South China Sea.

These are Liaoning’s first naval activities outside of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea, Continue reading “China: Ignoring UNCLOS, ordering a U.S. Navy cruiser to stop”

U.S. airlines expected to comply with Chinese ADIZ rules

Weak.

According to the State Department, the United States expects our airline carriers will comply with the ADIZ rules laid out by China in the Notice to Airmen announcing enforcement of the ADIZ.

As with the distinction we are observing with respect to Iran’s right to enrich uranium, our acceptance of the ADIZ rules does not mean we agree with them, according to the State Department formulation.  It just means our civilian airliners are complying with them.

Japan and South Korea are taking a different tack. Continue reading “U.S. airlines expected to comply with Chinese ADIZ rules”