Independence Day 2022

Happy Independence Day.

At such a time as this, brevity feels advisable.

I just reread the 4 July post from 2018, and was struck by its continued resonance.  Though I think the Democrats of 2022 have progressed even beyond their more perfect resonance with the Democrats lamented in the 1860 op-ed at the New York Times, this passage from that old piece still rings (nor should we kid ourselves that it’s not a fit for at least some portion of the GOP): Continue reading “Independence Day 2022”

Independence Day, 2015

Let freedom ring.

Detail, Patrick Henry before the Virginia House of Burgesses; Peter F. Rothermel (1817-1895)
Detail, Patrick Henry before the Virginia House of Burgesses; Peter F. Rothermel (1817-1895)

Another national holiday rolls around, and Americans ponder where we have been, and where we are going.  For those who are deeply troubled by recent events, taking time to celebrate a spirit of liberty and a national declaration that remain unequaled in human history may be a welcome break.  But it can’t instill a sense of complacency.

Now is not the time for the emptiness of false cheer.  But it is a time for taking courage from the remarkable deeds and thoughts of our political ancestors.  What they did was as impossible as what we may need to do.

So please give serious consideration to two selections from LU for Independence Day.

The spirit of liberty Continue reading “Independence Day, 2015”

America facing the truth II: The dialogue

A republic — if you can define it.

The watchmen wait for morning.
The watchmen wait for morning.

This post is a follow-on to the earlier post at Liberty Unyielding, “A time for facing the truth.”  The link is in the text below.

I realized after posting the lengthy comment copied below that I had basically written another blog post.  I’m not going to bother cleaning it up or adding points to make it more comprehensive.  Spurring the dialogue on this topic is the most important thing.  So this post will be a summary of the counterpoint created by much-appreciated reader comments from NaCly Dog, Stephanie O’Leary, and teejk, at my original post “A time for facing the truth.”

Disclaimer on my extended comment below:  there are of course other points to make about the vision we need for government and what has to happen to get there.  I haven’t tried to make all of those points, or even give a complete list of what the most important ones are.  Feel free to add your ideas; I’m not neglecting things that may be important, just keeping this going, because we’ve got to stay engaged. Continue reading “America facing the truth II: The dialogue”

The sound of freedom

The sound of freedom: noisy, challenging, the source of enduring greatness.

Do Americans today understand the deep, life-or-death difference between a society ruled by the sound of silence, and one ruled by the sound of freedom?

The sound of silence

Perhaps we are beginning to recall that difference.  We had better knowledge of it in the period of the Cold War, after World War II, when the examples of Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, and Maoist China towered over our imagination.   It was truly said of these dreadful regimes that they were ruled by terror and silence.  Indeed, the two go hand in hand; Elie Wiesel said that “silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”

German Protestant pastor Martin Niemoller, who spent World War II in concentration camps, spoke of silence in these famous terms: Continue reading “The sound of freedom”

1,338 Words that Changed the World

Let freedom ring.

Eleven score and fifteen years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.  There has never been another document in history like the one Thomas Jefferson wrote in June 1776. Continue reading “1,338 Words that Changed the World”