TOC Ready Room 26 October 2022: 101st Airborne in Romania; Kanye, China, and other wonders

What’s wrong and right with Russia-Ukraine, China and computers, and Ye.

This will be a rough-and-ready Ready Room, intended to spray a few current topics out there without going in-depth on any of them.  I really mean it this time, so throw rotten fruit if you catch a glimpse of over-analysis out here in the heathery rough.

The first topic is the headline teaser:  deployment of the U.S. 101st Airborne to Europe.  CBS did a segment this past week in which its crew accompanied soldiers of the 101st on field activities in Romania, just “a few miles” from the border of Ukraine.

A great deal was made of the point that the 101st hasn’t deployed to Europe since World War II. Continue reading “TOC Ready Room 26 October 2022: 101st Airborne in Romania; Kanye, China, and other wonders”

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Easter greetings from The Optimistic Conservative

He is risen indeed – Alleluia!

Heartfelt wishes to all for a blessed and happy Easter.

Keeping it simple this year with a hymn to rejoice by.

Alleluia!

He Is Risen.

Also, I failed earlier to get a separate Passover greeting posted.  Here’s what was on social media. Continue reading “Easter greetings from The Optimistic Conservative”

Christmas Greetings 2021

Glory to God in the highest! And peace to men on Earth.

This is turning into a tough Christmas week (technically, the fourth week of Advent), with some scheduling issues making it difficult to contemplate putting up a quality Christmas greetings post.

So instead of writing anything really new, I’ll link to a few old Christmas posts from Liberty Unyielding, and slot in a couple of videos to provide Christmas inspiration.

Feel free to just skip the old posts, Continue reading “Christmas Greetings 2021”

German schools rename ‘St. Martin’s Day’ fest – but look who opposes doing that

Preemptive dhimmitude.

St. Martin's Day - too Christian for the European left. (Image: Mitteldeutsche Zeitung)
St. Martin’s Day – too Christian for the European left. (Image: Mitteldeutsche Zeitung)

You just know this latest in the thousand cuts of “multi-kulti” cultural suicide has to do with fear of offending Muslim immigrants.  And it does.

But I urge readers to look past the surface and keep in mind who’s doing the slice-and-dice job.

The story at hand involves a school in Oberkassel, Dusseldorf, which has redesignated the traditional St. Martin’s Day festival, held on 11 November, as an absurdly generic “Festival of Light.”  German media reported this late last week, and it was picked up quickly by English-language outlets.  (It’s worth making the point, as an aside, that we not only have to give up the richness of our own Western culture to supposedly avoid offending those from other cultures; we have to dumb everything down as well, turning ourselves into primitive animists and nature-worshipers.  Having a festival about “light” is so 10,000 years ago.) Continue reading “German schools rename ‘St. Martin’s Day’ fest – but look who opposes doing that”

The future of our time: Rewriting ‘Westphalianism’

Interesting times: the new definition.

Past master. (Image via Outside the Beltway)
Past master. (Image via Outside the Beltway)

Reading Henry Kissinger’s typically well-considered and intelligent article for the Wall Street Journal this weekend (“A Path out of the Middle East Collapse”), I had a growing sense that it isn’t so much a prescription for the future as a description of the past.

The sense began with the first paragraph, in which Kissinger defines the scope of what’s collapsing, and dates it only to 1973, when the U.S. moved to stabilize the Middle East during the Yom Kippur War.

But far more than recent U.S. policy on the Middle East is collapsing today.  What we’re seeing is more like the collapse of “Rome” itself:  the organization of Western power as a Europe-centric territorial phenomenon, setting unbreachable boundaries north, south, and west of a restless and perennially “unorganizable” Middle East. Continue reading “The future of our time: Rewriting ‘Westphalianism’”